Lawrence vs. State of Texas Supreme Court results in Redistricting Network

October 3rd, 2009

State Texas supreme court LawrenceLawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court was a ground breaking United States Supreme Court case With a 6 to 3 ruling, the justices of the Supreme Court overruled the sodomy law in Texas. Back in 1986, the court had addressed a very similar situation in the Bowers vs. Hardwick case, where the Supreme Court upheld a challenged Georgia law, not finding a constitutional defense of sexual privacy. The court case of Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court ultimately overruled the decision of the Bowers vs. Hardwick case, stating that the Bowers vs. Hardwick case had viewed the liberty interest too thinly. It was commonly argued in the Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court that intimate consensual sexual behavior was a part of liberty which is protected by substantive due process under the fourteenth amendment.

The Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court case gained a large amount of public attention This resulted in an abundance of “friends of the court” briefs being filed. The result of the Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court was celebrated everywhere by gay rights activists who thought that the outcome of this case may affect similar cases in the future. Activists thought that since the outcome of Lawrence vs. The state of Texas Supreme Court had overturned the decision of the 1986 Bowers vs. Hardwick court case that the Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court case would mean a breakthrough in further cases and provide the same outcome for those cases, which would result in a dismissal since the activists seen these trials as a “victimless crime” and hoped the outcome would provoke court networks to redistrict their laws on such cases.

Much consideration was performed before reaching a decision of the Lawrence vs. The State of Texas Supreme Court Case The court journal said the court took into account whether the petitioners convictions under the Texas “Homosexual Conduct” law violated the fourteenth amendment guarantee of equal protection laws, whether the petitioners convictions for adult consensual sexual behavior in the privacy of their own home violated their vital interests in liberty and privacy protected by the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment, and last but not least, whether or not the outcome of the Bowers vs. Hardwick court case should be overturned.

In the end, the court ruled in a six to three favor to overturn the final verdict of the Bowers vs. Hardwick case of 1986 which meant the ruling in favor of LawrenceThe outcome of this ground breaking case was nationally heard and observed. It gained the support of large amounts of activists. The outcome of this case overturned Bowers vs. Hardwick, which twelve other states contained similar laws. In their closing statement, the court concluded in this case that “Bowers was not correct when it was decided, and it is not correct today. It ought not to remain binding precedent. Bowers vs. Hardwick should be and now is overturned.”